Tag Archives: Mario Batali

Pizzeria Mozza

Pizzeria Mozza has been around since 2011 – the first collaboration in Singapore between bread making extraordinaire, Nancy Silverton, Joe Bastianich and Mario Batalli.

One half of the two part restaurant (the other being Osteria Mozza), the pizzeria is equally as relaxed, but with a brighter decor that complements the bustling crowd. This isn’t meant to be a place to linger – order your pizza, eat it, vacate your table for the next hungry customers. There is also usually a mad rush before and after showtimes as the restaurant is directly opposite the Marina Bay Sands theatres.

The menu is actually very comprehensive, with a wide selection of antipasta, cured meats, salads, breads, desserts, and, of course, pizza. The pizza menu features traditional Italian meat and vegetable toppings, (and thankfully no seafood, which I continue to think have no right to be on a pizza), featuring housemade cheeses like burrata and mozarella.

And the pizza is why you go there. For that crust. Oh my goodness, that crust. It wouldn’t matter what you topped it with – the crust is amazing.  Dusted with semolina, the crust is crunchy, light and thin – but substantial enough to hold the topping.

The toppings are light – don’t expect the pizza to be loaded on top. A tiny bit on the salty side for me – although to be fair, I did order a margherita with anchovies – but easily one of the best pizzas you can get here.

Pizzeria Mozza
#B1-42/46 Marina Bay Sands
10 Bayfront Avenue  SINGAPORE 018956
Tel: +65 6688 8522

Open:  daily 17:30 – 23:00


Fresh egg pasta

Success ! My fresh egg pasta

I’ve had a pasta machine for a while now. My first experience was a complete disaster. My kitchen counter was too thick, so I had to end up experimenting with various sized books to try to clamp the machine to, none of which were heavy enough. The recipe I used was too dry and I wasn’t experienced enough with doughs to understand what consistency I was looking for. And I hadn’t planned ahead and had no where suitable to dry the pasta once it was rolled out. I made such a mess, ended up with horrid dry pasta, and the machine promptly went back in the box and stored.

Call it stubbornness – today I faced my fears and I conquered the machine !

My recipe is a combination of many others (including Jamie Oliver, Bertolli and Mario Batali) – I also had to consider that I am making my dough in hot and humid Singapore, so I think it’s just important to work the pasta dough until it’s the right consistency, adding flour and/or water as necessary, to make it a smooth, elastic dough. And I can’t stress enough how important it is to rest the dough, it becomes so soft and workable once the gluten has had a chance to relax. I have to admit it sure is easier and faster to just used dried pasta, but fresh pasta tastes so different, and making my own pasta gave me such a sense of satisfaction and was so much fun that I’m sure that made it even more tasty.

Ingredients makes enough for 2 hungry people

  1. 200g plain flour
  2. 2 eggs (I use really small eggs (60g) so if you have larger eggs then you’ll need a little more flour)
  3. 3 tablespoons iced water

Method

  1. Place the flour on your counter and make a well in the middle
  2. Crack your eggs in the middle, mix them and then slowly start incorporating the flour from the inside edges of the well
  3. Add the water and continue to incorporate until you can bring the dough together with your hands
  4. The dough at this stage will be very grainy and feel quite dry. This is where you get to channel all your frustrations and anger into the dough as it needs to be kneaded – a lot. There’s no real time I can give you (it took me 10 minutes) but you need to work the gluten so that you get a firm textured pasta, and you’ll know when to stop when the dough suddenly becomes smooth and elastic. I carried on kneading a bit more at this stage for good measure.
  5. Divide the dough into 4 small rounds, wrap in cling film to stop them from drying out, and let rest for at least 30 minutes
  6. Once you are ready and have your pasta machine clamped firmly onto something heavy (preferably your kitchen counter – for me it was my “Toys for Chefs” book!), and also have somewhere ready nearby that is suitable for drying your pasta (trust me you don’t want to have to worry about this when you have a handful of sticky pasta ribbons), set the machine to the first setting, and roll through one of the dough balls
  7. Fold it over and run it through on the first setting and repeat about ten times more. This helps to work the dough more and helps you get that lovely stretchy texture in your pasta
  8. Continue roll the dough through the various numbers on the machine until you have it at your desired thinness. I made fettucine and I like my pasta thin, so I rolled it till it reached maximum setting (9). You may want to have it thicker if you are making something that needs to be a bit more robust, like a lasagna sheet or rag pasta
  9. Dry the pasta ribbons on a floured rolling pin or other surface so that they don’t stick together. You have to work relatively quickly here because the pasta dries quite quickly
  10. When you’re done with all four portions of dough, you’re ready to cook the pasta. As the pasta is unseasoned, you need to heavily season the water you are cooking it in – it needs to taste “like the sea”
  11. What you do with the cooked pasta is entirely up to your imagination (I made a pesto pasta) and I guarantee you it will taste better than you imagined!

Osteria Mozza @ MBS

Burrata with bacon, marinated escarole and caramelised shallots

An impromptu decision to have dinner on a Friday night after drinks with friends, we called Osteria Mozza to find out that they had a table for us at 9.30 – Perfect. We were just at the Oyster Bar at Customs House so we took a walk around the harbour to find Mozza, both Osteria and the Pizzeria next door, packed. Thank goodness we didn’t just chance it.

We were quickly shown to our table by efficient and friendly waiters. The ambiance in there struck us as very New York – dimly lit (which makes for poor photos – sorry), dark wood, activity everywhere. From a few places I’ve been to where wooden floors meant terrible acoustics as sound bounced off the hard surfaces, they got it right here. Just the perfect amount of noise without you having to strain to hear your friends speak.

Ricotta and egg ravioli in browned butter

Of course we had to have the home made burrata – we chose burrata with bacon, grilled sardines, crispy pigs trotter ricotta and egg ravioli.
My only other experience of burrata has been at L’Operetta, which serves a much more traditional burrata. The burrata at Mozza lacks the “skin” which, when you slice it, allows the thickened cream to flow out – it’s more like a soft pillowy mound of creamy mozarella. Mozza served theirs on top of toasted sourdough, with crispy bacon and with a generous serving of marinated escarole and caramelised shallots. The escarole and shallots added a sharp zing to the dish which I assume is intended to cut through the richness of the burrata and bacon, but they overpowered the dish and we ended up just eating the burrata and bacon on the sourdough (which was delicious). The sardines were beautifully done and were served with fagioli misti – mixed beans although I just had chick peas with balsamic vinegar on my plate, that again overpowered the dish.

Crispy pigs trotter with frisée apple and mustard salad

The crispy pig’s trotter looked disappointing when served – a single deep fried disc of something crumbed with a frisée, apple and mustard salad – but the trotter inside was soft and tasty and the contrast in texture with the crispy exterior worked wonderfully well together. The ravioli was also not the most beautifully presented – a single, largely mounded ravioli in what looked like a sauce that had been burned with bits in it, but when cut in half, revealed a ricotta-encased soft boiled egg that flowed out into the browned butter sauce. Bold and delicate flavours married perfectly.

For mains we ordered the grilled wagyu beef tagliata and the brasata al barolo – braised short ribs. The first mouthful of each of these was full of oohs and aahs, but strangely by the end of the dishes neither really impressed.  The wagyu was tender and served classically with rucola and parmesan but there was just so much of the rucola and parmesan that it almost hid the beef, and the parmesan was completely unnecessary on a plate with such tasty meat. The braised short ribs were soft but a bit stringy but worked fantastically well with the soft polenta and freshly grated horseradish and gremolata.

I would definitely go back to Mozza for their starters and pasta or perhaps visit the pizzeria next door.  A great addition to Singapore’s dining scene but they need to work on presentation and please take it easy on the vinegar. Perhaps it was just the dishes we ordered but at this calibre, you’d think they’d have nailed that.

Osteria Mozza
Marina Bay Sands
10 Bayfront Ave, Singapore
Tel: +65 6688 8868