Tag Archives: prosciutto

Seared sesame tuna, fig and prosciutto salad

Whenever I can get my hands on juicy plump figs, this is my go to salad. Vibrant and fresh, it’s such a versatile and simple salad, and I love the delicate balance of salt, sweet and savoury. You can also coat the tuna in fennel or coriander seeds instead of sesame seeds (I used what I had available in my pantry).

It makes a healthy light lunch, or would work as a starter for dinner.

Ingredients
Serves 4

  1. 6-8 figs quartered
  2. sashimi grade tuna – about 400g
  3. 4 tbs sesame seeds (I used black)
  4. 2 tbs coarsely cracked black pepper
  5. 2 tbs coarse sea salt
  6. 2 tbs olive oil
  7. 4 large handfuls of rocket
  8. 4-8 thinly shaved slices of prosciutto
  9. 2-3 tbs extra virgin olive oil
  10. 2-3 tbs lemon juice
  11. lemon wedges to serve

Method

  1. Combine the sesame seeds, black pepper and salt and place on a flat plate
  2. Cut the tuna into thick strips – about 5cm wide
  3. Coat the tuna with the sesame seed/pepper/salt mix
  4. Heat olive oil in a pan.  Sear the tuna strips on all sides for 1 minute on each side – it should be rare inside.  Set aside to cool for 5 minutes
  5. Thinly slice the tuna and arrange with the figs on top of the rocket.
  6. “Drape’ slices of prosciutto on top
  7. Dress with olive oil and lemon juice
  8. Serve immediately
Advertisements

L’Operetta

Cutting the burrata

I’d read about L’operetta and wanted to try this Italian restaurant that served authentic pizza from Naples, with a Japanese owner and chef.

It’s at the end of what I call the “dead zone” of Boat Quay – the section past BQ Bar to the bridge, but its overtly opulent and brightly lit decor is at least sure to attract some attention from those coming from the bridge end of Boat Quay.

Friday night, and the place was 30% full when we got there at 8.30 …  Hmmm …. the waiter (who we found out started that night) had difficulty finding our reservation … Hmmm … Took us a while to even get our menus and wine list … Hmmm …

Then things turned around.

Burrata with prosciutto, baby tomatoes and arugula

Not long after we’d ordered, the Japanese Maitre D (also MD), Taka, came and started chatting to us about the Burrata he was serving.  Burrata is an epiphany for me – mozarella cheese made not from milk but from a mix of mozarella and cream, encased in a mozarella skin, imported from the heel of Italy (where he pointed to the heel of his very cool shoes), Puglia. Fresh, rich, creamy-as-hell, this thing is absolutely gorgeous.   Served with thinly shaved prosciutto, arugula and sweet sweet baby tomatoes, this pillow of cheese seemed almost to fill your mouth with more cheese than you put in there Definitely one to share because of its richness, and the size of the dish, but oh so good.

For some reason I didn’t go for the pizza and ended up ordering a sea urchin and grey mullet roe pasta which came disappointingly with lots of brocolli in it, and I think that flavour overpowered the delicate uni flavour I was expecting.  The uni and grey mullet roe did add a creaminess to the pasta, but perhaps not the best dish to complement the burrata.

On the other hand, the pizza that D ordered, totally did.

Napoletana-style wood-fired pizza with mozarella, prosciutto and rocket

Read the ieatishootipost post for details of the pizza (and watch the video!).  It is definitely different from what you can get in Singapore – the dough is crispy on the outside, soft on the inside, and chewy – almost naan-like.  And the toppings are simple and delicately flavoured.

The pizzas are all under $30.  The place is fun and the chef comes and chats to the tables to get feedback on the food.  And they have burrata :).  I just wish I worked around the Raffles Place area – that’s where I’d be lunching.  But I’ll be going back there again.  Oh yes.


’tis the season…to eat figs.

Fresh Israeli figs

I was thrilled when I popped across the road to the supermarket to find figs.  They are one of my favourite fruits but have such a short season, so I’ll buy them whenever I see them.  The ones I bought today were from Israel – so I’ll have to eat them within a day or two because they don’t keep for too long and they’ve travelled a long way.  Guess one of the downsides of living in a tiny island like Singapore is that you can’t get local produce.

If you buy figs, just keep in mind that they don’t ripen once they have been picked from the tree so make sure you select fruit that are a rich deep purple colour, plump and soft to the touch with unbroken skin.  And as with most fruit, smell them.  If they smell sweet – buy them !  If there is no smell, you can still buy them, just don’t plan on eating them fresh (you could halve them, drizzle them with honey and roast them, served with a good dollop of creme fraiche or marscapone) and if they smell sour, they’re past their due date.

When I lived in Sydney you could usually buy figs for a few weeks so I had the luxury of cooking many fig dishes – one of my favourites being a blue cheese and fig salad.  Simply sprinkle fresh quartered figs over a bed of spinach, crumble blue cheese on top (you could substitute goats cheese) with some toasted walnuts and drizzle with olive oil and balsamic vinegar.

Today though, I am going to make one of my favourite fig salads – fig and tuna salad.


Fresh fig and seared tuna salad

Ingredients
Serves 4

  • 6-8 figs quartered
  • sashimi grade tuna – about 400g
  • 2 tbs fennel seeds
  • 1 tbs coarsely cracked black pepper
  • 1 tbs coarse sea salt
  • 2 tbs olive oil
  • 4 large handfuls of rocket
  • 2-3 tbs extra virgin olive oil
  • 2-3 tbs lemon juice
  • lemon wedges to serve

Method

  1. Combine the fennel seeds, black pepper and salt and place on a flat plate
  2. Cut the tuna into 5cm square strips
  3. Coat the tuna with the fennel seed/pepper/salt mix
  4. Heat olive oil in a pan.  Sear the tuna strips on all sides for 1 minute on each side – it should be rare inside.  Set aside to cool for 5 minutes
  5. Thinly slice the tuna and arrange with the figs on top of the rocket.  Dress with olive oil and lemon juice
  6. Serve immediately

A variation which is even more simple is to top a bed of rocket with quartered figs and layer some prosciutto on top.